Margaret C. Berry speaks at Tejas Club, talks Round Up, tuition

Vera Bespalova

Distinguished alumna Margaret C. Berry graduated from UT in 1937 — the same year construction of the Tower was completed — but Thursday night, she spoke to students at the Tejas Club about her time at UT.

Berry is a campus legend, a historian and the only student to have been both an Orange Jacket and an honorary Tejas Brave.

During her conversation, Berry discussed everything from Round Up in the 1930s to her thoughts on the U.S. possibly electing the first female president come November.

“[Hillary Clinton’s] so smart, she might get it, but I’m not sure if the country is ready for a woman yet,” Berry said.

Berry reflected on her childhood and said the most inspiring woman in her life has been her mother, Lillian Berry, a school teacher born in Mississippi in 1887.

“I had a good life, [my parents] were good to me,” Berry said.

Berry also commented on tuition — which she said was $25 a semester during her time at UT — and said the University needs to cut down on tuition increases. She also stressed the importance of out-of-class experiences, such as Tejas Coffee.

“I’m sure many students learn more from attending those coffees than they do from attending their classes,” Berry said.

When asked about the changes that have taken place at the University since her time here, Berry said some of the things happening now, such as the opening of the new medical school, would never have been dreamed of during her time as a student.

“Change is going to occur, and you can’t stop it,” Berry said.

Finance sophomore Christopher Boyd, who attended the event, said hearing about Berry’s student experiences was valuable because she already lived through many of the things that he is encountering now.

“I mean everything that’s happened in her life was just incredible,” Boyd said.

McKay Proctor, supply chain management and business honors junior and vice president of Tejas Club, organized the event.

“She’s been where so much of the action of this University has been over the last 70 years, so it’s amazing,” Proctor said.

Proctor said the way that Dr. Berry talked about the University was inspiring.

“We’re proud of UT,” Berry said. “You can be proud that you came here. You can go out from here knowing that you attended one of the best universities in the country.”

Berry is a campus legend, a historian and the only student to have been both an Orange Jacket and an honorary Tejas Brave.

During her conversation, Berry discussed everything from Round Up in the 1930s to her thoughts on the U.S. possibly electing the first female president come November.

“[Hillary Clinton’s] so smart, she might get it, but I’m not sure if the country is ready for a woman yet,” Berry said.

Berry reflected on her childhood and said the most inspiring woman in her life has been her mother, Lillian Berry, a school teacher born in Mississippi in 1887.

“I had a good life, [my parents] were good to me,” Berry said.

Berry also commented on tuition — which she said was $25 a semester during her time at UT — and said the University needs to cut down on tuition increases. She also stressed the importance of out-of-class experiences, such as Tejas Coffee.

“I’m sure many students learn more from attending those coffees than they do from attending their classes,” Berry said.

When asked about the changes that have taken place at the University since her time here, Berry said some of the things happening now, such as the opening of the new medical school, would never have been dreamed of during her time as a student.

“Change is going to occur, and you can’t stop it,” Berry said.

Finance sophomore Christopher Boyd, who attended the event, said hearing about Berry’s student experiences was valuable because she already lived through many of the things that he is encountering now.

“I mean everything that’s happened in her life was just incredible,” Boyd said.

McKay Proctor, supply chain management and business honors junior and vice president of Tejas Club, organized the event.

“She’s been where so much of the action of this University has been over the last 70 years, so it’s amazing,” Proctor said.

Proctor said the way that Dr. Berry talked about the University was inspiring.

“We’re proud of UT,” Berry said. “You can be proud that you came here. You can go out from here knowing that you attended one of the best universities in the country.”